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Aspects of Yaghnobi Grammar – Thesis Finished! July 21, 2008

Posted by Bahrom in Endangered Languages, Linguistics, Orthography, Syntax, Tajikistan, Yaghnobi.
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In December of last year I submitted my thesis on Yaghnobi grammar to the graduate school of the University of Oregon. After serveral rounds of review and revision, the thesis was accepted. Printed copies are available in the U of O Knight Library and the Linguistics departmentLibrary. I have also uploaded a down-loadable copy  to this blog. Many thanks for all the critique, suggestions, and comments. I have incorporated all of your feedback in one way or another to make this a much better description of Yaghnobi grammar. (more…)

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History of the Yaghnobi People October 15, 2007

Posted by Bahrom in History, Tajikistan, Yaghnobi.
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The Yaghnobi, who have inhabited the high mountain valley of Yaghnob in west-central Tajikistan for centuries, have been identified as descendants of the ancient Sogdians. The kingdom of Sogdiana existed from before the sixth century BCE until the Arab conquests of the eighth century CE. The Sogdian territory occupied what is now northern Tajikistan and southern Uzbekistan (Raspopova and Shishkina, 1999). From the fifth to the eighth centuries, the Sogdians were the main caravan merchants of  the Silk Road which passed through the Sogdian cities of Samarqand (their capital) and Bukhara (Vaissiere, 2004). The Sogdians also established extensive colonies in what is now western China. Their influence was so extensive that Sogdian, an east-Iranian language, was the lingua franca of Central Asia during the seventh century (Dien). The region to the south of Sogdiana, Ustashana (also called Sorushna) was also populated by Sogdian speaking people (Negmatov, 1999). Its capital, Bunjikat, was near present day Istravshan in northwest Tajikistan (Bosworth, 2005). The dialect of Sogdian spoken in Ustrashana in the eighth century has been identified through lexical and phonological similarities as the language from which modern Yaghnobi has descended. (more…)